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Photos, design, music, and odd finds...

"And the more I thought about it, the more I dug out my memory, things I had overlooked or forgotten....."

D|MA Erkki Huhtamo [Lecture #2]

sterescope

ERKKI HUHTAMO – LOST (AND FOUND0 IN THE THIRD DIMENSION: STEROSCOPY AND THE ARTISTIC IMAGINATION

First, and foremost, I have to say that watching Huhtamo lecture is always a treat! He is so full of life and it’s pretty infectious. I really do miss his Design 10A class. I think all DESMA classes need to be lectured on Maywa Denki, just as Huhtamo had. 

 

Anyways, His lecture was pretty wonderful, as usual. I didn’t know that Marcel Duchamp had anything to do with the stereoscopic movement. I vaguely remembered that he created a series of Retroleaf Discs in the 1930’s but didn’t know that his connection spanned many years back. The whole stereoscopic phenomenon is really intriguing because it was fueled by the natural/human desire to develop and expand one’s interests and expressions onto the world. Photography had been around since as early as1826 (That I am proud to say, I know). Joseph Nicéphore Niépce photographed the view from his bedroom window. So much has evolved from this one small, poorly developed image, and I mean in the span of only a view years. Stereoscopes were around as early as 1838.

 

The concept of stereoscopic images/viewers is that the mind fuses together two 2D images together. This is aided by a wooden box with two peep-holes, which allow the viewer to look into the intended “scene/scenario.” When seen side by side, at the same time, the two images give off an almost 3D effect.

 

Huhtamo talked quite a bit on stereoscopic history and how it had contributed to social, economic, and even ideological change in society. These stereoscopes can be directly linked to the advancement of the 3D movie trend of the 1950’s and with the 3D blockbusters of today. It’s pretty amazing that this basic concept has been around for a long while but is only really picking up in these last few years. Maybe to pull something off at this caliber, and for it to be successful, you would still need a bit of money?

 

Regardless, it was nice to hear someone talk so passionately about a topic that may or may not interest the general masses. It definitely interested me.

D|MA Pae White [Lecture #1]

Pae White

The Pae White Lecture on Tuesday October 11th, was pretty educational. I liked her viewpoint on public art. In one of her first shows after graduating, she focused on the textile designer Vera Newman. It interested me that she used her connection and nostalgia to this designer to create her own vision. By taking/collecting different textile pieces, such as scarves, napkins, and tablecloths, White was able to represent her feelings and memories though Newman’s work. White ended up taking all of those textile pieces and shielding them under glass, and spreading them miscellaneously around the American Center in Paris. White used the outdoor space to represent her work, and made mini retrospectives. The fact that she used the actual pieces and did not make replicas was refreshing. She said that she wanted the textiles to fade to show the passing of time. As stated by White, “The fragility and the inevitable damage of the piece,” is something that is far more intriguing.

I loved that White got very technically descriptive with her work. We have often had brilliant designers come and speak, but only mention the conceptual aspects of their work. That is wonderful, but I feel that the fact that she spoke about the “how” really helped solidify her work’s importance, and even tangibility.

I was also drawn to her viewpoint on graphic design. White said that she “used graphic design as a way to make art.” Brian Eno, Peter Norton, and Peter Schmidt came together in the 1970’s and made a deck of cards that had 100 phrases that would stimulate brainstorming and creative thought. After Norton bought the rights, he came to White to ask her to design the deck. Her candidness about the fact that she didn’t know how to use Illustrator until that assignment was inspirational. It was a good reminder that often times we, as students, may go into assignments or jobs without previous knowledge of the tools which we need to use. Regardless, we learn through the process, just as she had.

She was a very honest/candid speaker, which I definitely appreciated. 

Blind Roosevelt Graves

I’ll Be Rested (When The Roll Is Called)  

I’ve been experimenting with different papers, gessos, and finishes to see what techniques will work best for my portion of our piece. I will be making two standard sized pillows that will be made completely of paper, thread, and zippers. I’ve found some incredible books and text that I feel will work well, but I will also just add a little bit of thicker paper (sew paper on paper) for structure. I think I will lattice the book paper together to create a pattern and change the context of the written work. So far I know that the test doesn’t look like much but I know it is headed towards the right direction. 
I’m pretty excited about what we’ve come up with. I’m digging all the video portions that Ashi, Chris, and Julie will make and I think the paper pillows will [hopefully] tie in well with our concept and be a comforting addition to this slightly serene setting we anticipate to create.   

I’ve been experimenting with different papers, gessos, and finishes to see what techniques will work best for my portion of our piece. I will be making two standard sized pillows that will be made completely of paper, thread, and zippers. I’ve found some incredible books and text that I feel will work well, but I will also just add a little bit of thicker paper (sew paper on paper) for structure. I think I will lattice the book paper together to create a pattern and change the context of the written work. So far I know that the test doesn’t look like much but I know it is headed towards the right direction. 

I’m pretty excited about what we’ve come up with. I’m digging all the video portions that Ashi, Chris, and Julie will make and I think the paper pillows will [hopefully] tie in well with our concept and be a comforting addition to this slightly serene setting we anticipate to create.   

Midterm Madness.

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